PEN International © 2017
Terms & Conditions | Privacy Statement

RESOLUTION ON THE WAR IN UKRAINE

Spanish and French versions below.

Resolution on the war in Ukraine

On 24 February 2022, the Russian Federation launched a full-scale military invasion of Ukraine, triggering a human rights and humanitarian crisis on an unimaginable scale. Thousands of civilians have been killed or injured in attacks by Russian forces who stand accused of war crimes, crimes against humanity or genocide[i], including summary executions of civilians and prisoners of war, arbitrary detention and forced mass deportations, kidnapping and disappearance, torture and ill-treatment, conflict-related sexual violence, and crimes against cultural heritage.[ii] Over 7 million people have been internally displaced, with 7.4 million having fled Ukraine to other countries. Two million people, including children orphaned or separated from their parents because of the war, have been forcibly taken to the Russian Federation. Relentless shelling of residential areas, medical facilities and schools have caused widespread deaths and destruction. All this comes against the backdrop of a nuclear threat from the Russian Federation. The United Nations has warned that the Russian Federation’s war against Ukraine – combined with the effects of climate change and the Covid-19 pandemic – threatens to cause a global food crisis that may last for years.[iii] War pollutes, and anything released into Ukraine’s soil, nuclear or chemical, threatens the future peace and life of all.

The free flow of independent and accurate news and information is essential in conflict situations. PEN International is deeply concerned about the safety of journalists and media workers in Ukraine, with reports of them being targeted, kidnapped, attacked, and killed. At least 39 Ukrainian and foreign journalists and media workers have been killed during the war; eight of them have lost their lives while carrying out their professional duties: Yevhen Sakun, Brent Renaud, Oleksandra Kuvshynova, Pierre Zakrzewski, Oksana Baulina, Maks Levin, Mantas Kvedaravičius, and Frédéric Leclerc-Imhoff.[iv] Journalists are considered civilians under international humanitarian law. An attack to kill, wound or abduct a journalist is a war crime. PEN International is further concerned about the safety of Ukrainian writer Volodymyr Vakulenko, who was reportedly detained by Russian forces towards the end of March in the Kharkiv region and has not been heard from since.[v] Human rights activists and journalist Maksym Butkevych has been held captive by the Russian forces since June after he joined the Ukrainian Armed Forces to defend Ukraine.[vi]

PEN International is alarmed by the campaign of disinformation waged by the Russian authorities in Ukraine. Media and internet infrastructure appear to have been intentionally targeted to disrupt access to information, including through strings of cyber-attacks. Media equipment and installations constitute civilian objects and shall not be the object of attack or reprisals. The use of propaganda for war and national hatred, which fuels the violence, must urgently stop.[vii] The Russian Federation’s war not only targets Ukraine as a state and Ukrainians as a nation, but it also targets Ukrainian identity and culture. Many museums, libraries and archives have come under attack. Museums across the country are evacuating art and cultural treasures in a bid to save Ukraine’s cultural heritage from destruction.[viii] As of September 2022, the Russian Federation has already committed 514 crimes against the cultural heritage of Ukraine, mostly in the Kharkiv, Donetsk and Kyiv regions.[ix] Among them are sites of national importance, of local importance, newly discovered cultural heritage sites, and objects of valuable historical buildings. At least 183 religious sites have been damaged by the Russian army in 14 regions of Ukraine.[x]

The situation in territory controlled by Russian armed forces and affiliated armed groups is of grave concern. The already limited civic space in occupied Crimea, Donetsk, and Luhansk – under Russian control since March 2014 – is shrinking even further.[xi] Scores of Crimean residents have been prosecuted merely for calling for peace, in flagrant violation of international law, which compels the Russian Federation to respect the penal laws of the occupied territory. ‘Russian standards’ are being imposed in local schools, with the teaching of Ukrainian language, history and literature being phased out. Access to Ukrainian television channels has been blocked and internet service providers replaced with Russian ones.[xii] Citizen journalists and human rights activists continue to be kept behind bars on politically motivated ground, including citizen journalists Osman Arifmemetov, Marlen (Suleyman) Asanov, Asan Akhtemov, Remzi Bekirov, Tymur Ibrahimov, Server Mustafayev, Seyran Saliyev, Ruslan Suleymanov, Rustem Sheikhaliyev, Amet Suleymanov, Vilen Temeryanov and Iryna Danilovych[xiii], as well as journalists Oleksiy Bessarabov, Vladyslav Yesypenko, and Nariman Dzhelyal – the First Deputy Chairman of the Mejlis of Crimean Tatar People, a former journalist. Sham referenda in the occupied areas of the Donetsk, Kherson, Luhansk and Zaporizhzhia regions are yet another breach of international law and a pretext for the Russian Federation to illegally annex Ukrainian land.

The Russian Federation is treating its international obligations with contempt. It is flouting the very principles of the Charter of the United Nations, especially provisions on security and peace among countries, to silence critical voices.[xiv]

At its 83rd World Congress in Lviv, Ukraine, the PEN community united in one voice to call for a peaceful resolution to the Russian Federation’s war in Ukraine. The Assembly of Delegates of PEN International, meeting at its 88th annual Congress in Uppsala, Sweden, utterly condemns the Russian Federation’s full-fledged war on Ukraine and urges the Russian Federation to:

§ Immediately end the war in Ukraine;

§ Investigate allegations, prosecute, and punish members of armed forces found to have committed violations of international human rights law and international humanitarian law, including summary executions, sexual violence, torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment against civilians and prisoners of war;

§ Immediately release all those held solely for the peaceful exercise of their right to freedom of expression, including Osman Arifmemetov, Marlen (Suleyman) Asanov, Asan Akhtemov, Remzi Bekirov, Tymur Ibrahimov, Server Mustafayev, Seyran Saliyev, Ruslan Suleymanov, Rustem Sheikhaliyev, Amet Suleymanov, Vilen Temeryanov, Oleksiy Bessarabov, Vladyslav Yesypenko, Nariman Dzhelyal, and Iryna Danilovych;

§ Immediately cease the practice of enforced disappearance and do all within their power to clarify the fate of all persons subjected to enforced disappearance or otherwise missing, including Volodymyr Vakulenko and Maksym Butkevych, with a view of prosecuting and punishing those responsible, and ensure effective remedies to victims;

§ Immediately halt practices of arrest, prosecution, or conviction of civilians for acts committed or for opinions or ideas expressed before its occupation of territory in Ukraine and that were not criminalised at that time.

It also calls on the international community to:

§ Continue to urge the Russian Federation to end the war in Ukraine immediately and unconditionally;

§ Ensure a comprehensive and systematic response to all persons fleeing Ukraine, without discrimination;

§ Increase support to ensure media sustainability in Ukraine. Initiatives that enable Ukrainian journalists and media in exile to continue their professional work should also be supported in a manner that is sustainable and adapted to the exceptional conditions they are facing;

▪ Support all efforts to ensure accountability, at the national and international level, for violations of international human rights law and international humanitarian law committed in Ukraine, and work collectively towards provision of remedy, redress and reparation for past violations and the prevention of further violations.

[i] OHCHR, The situation of human rights in Ukraine in the context of the armed attack by the Russian Federation, 24 February 2022 to 15 May 2022, published in June 2022, available at: https://www.ohchr.org/en/documents/country-reports/situation-human-rights-ukraine-context-armed-attack-russian-federation. On 2 March 2022, the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court announced that he opened an investigation into the situation in Ukraine on the basis of the referrals received. The scope of the situation encompasses allegations of war crimes, crimes against humanity or genocide committed in Ukraine from 21 November 2013 onwards: https://www.icc-cpi.int/ukraine

[ii] Ministry of Culture and Information Policy of Ukraine, Russia has already committed 434 crimes against the cultural heritage of Ukraine, 22 July 2022, available at: https://www.kmu.gov.ua/en/news/mkip-rosiia-zdiisnyla-vzhe-434-zlochyny-proty-kulturnoi-spadshchyny-ukrainy

[iii] UN, If We Don’t Feed People, We Feed Conflict, Secretary-General tells Global Foo7d Security Call to Action Ministerial Event, Warning Mass Hunger Looms, 18 May 2022, available at: https://press.un.org/en/2022/sgsm21285.doc.htm

[iv] PEN Ukraine, Journalists at war, available at: https://pen.org.ua/en/zhurnalisty-na-vijni-monitoryng-zlochyniv-rosijskyh-okupantiv-proty-vilnyh-media-onovlyuyetsya

[v] PEN Ukraine, Ukrainian writer Volodymyr Vakulenko kidnapped by Russian occupiers, 11 April 2022, available at: https://pen.org.ua/en/ukrayinskogo-pysmennyka-volodymyra-vakulenka-ta-jogo-syna-vykraly-rosijski-okupanty

[vi] PEN Ukraine, Human rights activist and journalist Maksym Butkevych held captive by Russian occupiers, 11 July 2022, available at: https://pen.org.ua/en/pravozahisnik-i-zhurnalist-maksim-butkevich-v-rosijskomu-poloni

[vii] OHCHR, Ukraine: Joint statement on Russia’s invasion and importance of freedom of expression and information, 4 May 2022, available at: https://www.ohchr.org/en/statements-and-speeches/2022/05/ukraine-joint-statement-russias-invasion-and-importance-freedom

[viii] The Guardian, ‘Ukraine’s heritage is under direct attack’: why Russia is looting the country’s museums, 27 May 2022, available at: https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2022/may/27/ukraine-russia-looting-museums

[ix] Ministry of Culture and Information Policy of Ukraine: Save Ukrainian Culture, available at: https://restore.mkip.gov.ua/en

[x] Ministry of Culture and Information Policy of Ukraine: Russia has damaged at least 183 religious sites in Ukraine, 27 July 2022, available at: https://www.kmu.gov.ua/en/news/mkip-rosiia-vzhe-zruinuvala-v-ukraini-shchonaimenshe-183-relihiini-sporudy

[xi] PEN International’s Resolution on the state of freedom of expression in Crimea, adopted by the Assembly of Delegates in 2019, available at: https://pen-international.org/app/uploads/RESOLUTION-ON-THE-STATE-OF-FREEDOM-OF-EXPRESSION-IN-CRIMEA.pdf

[xii] Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Ukrainian Teachers Balk As Moscow Seeks To Impose 'Russian Standards' In Occupied Territories, 23 May 2022, available at: https://www.rferl.org/a/ukraine-kherson-education-russian-occupation/31862426.html

[xiii] PEN Ukraine, Statement on enforced disappearance of Iryna Danilovych in occupied Crimea, 9 May 2022, available at: https://pen.org.ua/en/zayava-cshodo-nasilnickogo-zniknennya-irini-danilovich-v-okupovanomu-krimu

[xiv] United Nations Stands with People of Ukraine, Secretary-General Tells General Assembly, Stressing ‘Enough Is Enough’, Fighting Must Stop, as Emergency Session Gets Under Way, 28 February 2022, available at: https://press.un.org/en/2022/ga12404.doc.htm


Spanish version

RESOLUCIÓN SOBRE LA GUERRA EN UCRANIA

El 24 de febrero de 2022, la Federación Rusa lanzó una invasión militar de Ucrania a gran escala, desencadenando una crisis humanitaria y de derechos humanos de una envergadura inimaginable. Miles de civiles han sido asesinados o heridos en ataques de las fuerzas militares rusas a las que se imputan crímenes de guerra, crímenes contra la humanidad o genocidio,[i] incluidas ejecuciones sumarias de civiles y prisioneros de guerra, detenciones arbitrarias y deportaciones masivas forzosas, secuestros y desapariciones, tortura y malos tratos, violencia sexual relativa al conflicto armado y crímenes contra el patrimonio cultural.[ii] Más de 7 millones de personas han sido internamente desplazadas y 7.4 millones de ellos han huido de Ucrania para refugiarse en otros países. Dos millones de personas, entre ellas niños huérfanos o separados de sus padres a causa de la guerra, han sido llevadas por la fuerza a la Federación Rusa. Los bombardeos incesables de áreas residenciales, instalaciones médicas y escuelas han dado lugar a numerosas muertes y abundante destrucción. Todo ello en el contexto de una amenaza nuclear por parte de la Federación Rusa. La Organización para las Naciones Unidas ha advertido que la guerra de la Federación Rusa contra Ucrania (combinada con los efectos del cambio climático y la pandemia de la COVID-19) amenaza con causar una crisis alimentaria global que puede durar años.[iii] La guerra contamina y todo lo que se libera en el suelo de Ucrania, sea nuclear o químico, amenaza la paz y la vida futura de todos.

En situaciones de conflicto, la libre circulación de noticias e información independientes y precisas es esencial. PEN Internacional está profundamente preocupado por la seguridad de los periodistas y trabajadores de los medios de comunicación en Ucrania, debido a informaciones de que están siendo objetivo de secuestros, ataques y asesinatos. Al menos 39 periodistas y trabajadores de los medios de comunicación ucranianos y extranjeros han sido asesinados durante la guerra; ocho de ellos han perdido la vida mientras desempeñaban sus labores profesionales: Yevhen Sakun, Brent Renaud, Oleksandra Kuvshynova, Pierre Zakrzewski, Oksana Baulina, Maks Levin, Mantas Kvedaravičius y Frédéric Leclerc-Imhoff.[iv] A nte la ley humanitaria internacional los periodistas se consideran civiles. Un ataque para matar, herir o secuestrar a un periodista es un crimen de guerra. PEN International está especialmente preocupado por la seguridad del escritor ucraniano Volodymyr Vakulenko, quien fue supuestamente detenido por las fuerzas rusas hacia finales de marzo en la región de Kharkiv y de los que no se ha vuelto a saber desde entonces.[v] El activista de derechos humanos y periodista Maksym Butkevych lleva cautivo de las fuerzas armadas rusas desde junio después de que se uniera a las fuerzas armadas ucranianas para defender a su país.[vi]

PEN Internacional se siente alarmado por la campaña de desinformación llevada a cabo por las autoridades rusas en Ucrania. Los medios de comunicación y la infraestructura de Internet parecen haber sido objetivos intencionales para impedir el acceso a la información, incluidos ataques cibernéticos. Las instalaciones y equipos de los medios de comunicación constituyen objetos civiles y no deben ser objeto de ataques o represalias. El uso de la propaganda para la guerra y el odio nacional, que alienta la violencia, debe cesar urgentemente.[vii] La guerra de la Federación Rusa no solo ataca a Ucrania como Estado y a los ucranianos como nación, sino que también ataca a la identidad y la cultura ucranianas. Numerosos museos, bibliotecas y archivos han sido objetos de ataques. Museos del país están evacuando tesoros culturales y artísticos en un intento de preservar la herencia cultural de Ucrania de la destrucción.[viii] A fecha de septiembre de 2022, la Federación Rusa ya ha cometido 514 crímenes contra el patrimonio cultural de Ucrania, la mayor parte de ellos en las regiones de Kharkiv, Donetsk y Kyiv.[ix] Entre ellos se encuentran lugares de importancia nacional, importancia local, lugares de patrimonio cultural descubiertos recientemente y edificios y objetos de gran valor histórico. Al menos 183 centros religiosos han sufrido daños por parte del ejército ruso en 14 regiones de Ucrania.[x]

La situación en el territorio controlado por las fuerzas armadas rusas y los grupos armados afiliados es de grave preocupación. El ya reducido espacio cívico en los territorios ocupados de Crimea, Donetsk, y Luhansk (bajo dominio ruso desde marzo de 2014) está disminuyendo aún más.[xi] Decenas de residentes de Crimea han sufrido persecución simplemente por hacer un llamamiento a la paz, algo que viola flagrantemente la legislación internacional, que obliga a la Federación Rusa a respetar las leyes penales del territorio ocupado. En las escuelas locales se están imponiendo los «estándares rusos» y la enseñanza de la lengua, historia y literatura ucranianas está desapareciendo gradualmente. El acceso a los canales de televisión ucranianos se ha bloqueado y los proveedores de servicios de Internet ucranianos se han sustituido por otros rusos.[xii] Numerosos periodistas ciudadanos y activistas de los derechos humanos siguen encarcelados por motivos políticos, entre ellos los periodistas ciudadanos Osman Arifmemetov, Marlen (Suleyman) Asanov, Asan Akhtemov, Remzi Bekirov, Tymur Ibrahimov, Server Mustafayev, Seyran Saliyev, Ruslan Suleymanov, Rustem Sheikhaliyev, Amet Suleymanov, Vilen Temeryanov e Iryna Danilovych,[xiii] así como los periodistas Oleksiy Bessarabov, Vladyslav Yesypenko y Nariman Dzhelyal, el primer presidente adjunto del Congreso del Pueblo Tártaro de Crimea, un antiguo periodista. Los falsos referendos en las zonas ocupadas de las regiones de Donetsk, Kherson, Luhansk y Zaporizhzhia son otra violación del derecho internacional y un pretexto para que la Federación Rusa se anexione ilegalmente tierras ucranianas.

La Federación Rusa está tratando sus obligaciones internacionales con desprecio. Está ignorando los principios de la Carta de las Naciones Unidas, especialmente las disposiciones sobre seguridad y paz entre países, para silenciar voces críticas.[xiv]

En su 83º Congreso Mundial en in Lviv, Ucrania, la comunidad PEN se unió en una sola voz para hacer un llamamiento por una resolución pacífica a la guerra de la Federación Rusia en Ucrania. La Asamblea de Delegados de PEN Internacional, reunida en su 88º Congreso anual en Upsala, Suecia, condena enérgicamente la guerra abierta de la Federación Rusia sobre Ucrania e insta a la Federación Rusa a:

§ Detener inmediatamente la guerra en Ucrania;

§ Investigar alegaciones, perseguir y castigar a miembros de las fuerzas armadas que han cometido violaciones de las leyes de derechos humanos internacionales y leyes humanitarias internacionales, incluidas ejecuciones sumarias, violencia sexual, tortura y otros tratos crueles, inhumanos o degradantes contra civiles y prisioneros de guerra;

§ Liberar de manera inmediata a todos los detenidos exclusivamente por el ejercicio pacífico de su derecho a la libertad de expresión, incluidos Osman Arifmemetov, Marlen (Suleyman) Asanov, AsanAkhtemov, Remzi Bekirov, Tymur Ibrahimov, Server Mustafayev, Seyran Saliyev, Ruslan Suleymanov, Rustem Sheikhaliyev, Amet Suleymanov, Vilen Temeryanov, Oleksiy Bessarabov, Vladyslav Yesypenko, Nariman Dzhelyal e Iryna Danilovych;

§ Cesar inmediatamente la práctica de la desaparición forzosa y hacer todo lo que esté en su mano para clarificar el paradero de todas las personas sometidas a desaparición forzosa o desaparecidas de cualquier otro modo, incluidos Volodymyr Vakulenko y Maksym Butkevych, con el fin de procesar y castigar a todos los responsables y garantizar que las víctimas obtengan reparación;

§ Detener con carácter inmediato las prácticas de detención, persecución o condena de civiles por hechos cometidos o por opiniones o ideas expresadas antes de su ocupación del territorio en Ucrania y que no estaban criminalizadas en dicho periodo.

También insta a la comunidad internacional a:

§ Seguir instando a la Federación Rusa a que ponga fin a la guerra en Ucrania de manera inmediata e incondicional;

§ Garantizar una respuesta integral y sistemática a todas las personas que huyen de Ucrania, sin discriminación;

§ Aumentar el apoyo para asegurar la sostenibilidad de los medios de comunicación en Ucrania. También se deberían incentivar las iniciativas que permitan a los periodistas y trabajadores de los medios de comunicación en el exilio seguir realizando su labor profesional de una manera sostenible y adaptada a las condiciones excepcionales a las que se enfrentan;

§ Apoyar todos los esfuerzos para garantizar la responsabilidad, tanto a nivel nacional como internacional, por las violaciones de las leyes de derechos humanos y la ley humanitaria internacional cometidas en Ucrania, y trabajar colectivamente para lograr la provisión de resarcimiento, desagravio y reparación por violaciones pasadas, así como la prevención de futuras violaciones.

[i] OHCHR, The situation of human rights in Ukraine in the context of the armed attack by the Russian Federation (La situación de los derechos humanos en Ucrania en el contexto del ataque armado de la Federación Rusa), 24 de febrero de 2022 a 15 de mayo de 2022, publicado en junio de 2022, disponible en: https://www.ohchr.org/en/docum... . El 2 de marzo de 2022, el Fiscal del Tribunal Penal Internacional anunció que abriría una investigación de la situación en Ucrania basándose en las solicitudes recibidas. El alcance de la situación incluye denuncias de crímenes de guerra, crímenes contra la humanidad o genocidio cometidos en Ucrania desde el 21 de noviembre de 2013: https://www.icc-cpi.int/ukrain...

[ii] Ministerio de Cultura y Política de Información de Ucrania, Russia has already committed 434 crimes against the cultural heritage of Ukraine (Rusia ya ha cometido 434 crímenes contra el patrimonio cultural de Ucrania), 22 de julio de 2022, disponible en: https://www.kmu.gov.ua/en/news...

[iii] ONU, If We Don’t Feed People, We Feed Conflict, Secretary-General tells Global Foo7d Security Call to Action Ministerial Event, Warning Mass Hunger Looms (Si no alimentamos a las personas, alimentamos el conflicto, el Secretario-General pide que se actúe para salvaguardar la seguridad alimentaria global en un evento ministerial, pronosticando la llegada de una hambruna masiva), 18 de mayo de 2022, disponible en: https://press.un.org/en/2022/s...

[iv] PEN Ucrania, Journalists at war (Periodistas en guerra), disponible en: https://pen.org.ua/en/zhurnali...

[v] PEN Ucrania, Ukrainian writer Volodymyr Vakulenko kidnapped by Russian occupiers (El escritor ucraniano Volodymyr Vakulenko secuestrado por ocupantes rusos), 11 de abril de 2022, disponible en: https://pen.org.ua/en/ukrayins...

[vi] PEN Ucrania, Human rights activist and journalist Maksym Butkevych held captive by Russian occupiers (El activista de derechos humanos y periodista Maksym Butkevych retenido cautivo por ocupantes rusos), 11 de julio de 2022, disponible en: https://pen.org.ua/en/pravozah...

[vii] OHCHR, Ucrania: Joint statement on Russia’s invasion and importance of freedom of expression and information (Declaración conjunta sobre la invasión de Rusia y la importancia de la libertad de expresión e información), 4 de mayo de 2022, disponible en: https://www.ohchr.org/en/state...

[viii] The Guardian, Ukraine’s heritage is under direct attack’: why Russia is looting the country’s museums (El patrimonio de Ucrania está bajo ataque directo»: por qué Rusia está saqueando los museos del país), 27 de mayo de 2022, disponible en: https://www.theguardian.com/ar...

[ix] Ministerio de Cultura y Política de Información de Ucrania: Salvar la Cultura Ucraniana disponible en: https://restore.mkip.gov.ua/en

[x] Ministerio de Cultura y Política de Información de Ucrania: Russia has damaged at least 183 religious sites in Ukraine (Rusia ha dañado al menos 183 centros religiosos en Ucrania), 27 de julio de 2022, disponible en: https://www.kmu.gov.ua/en/news...

[xi] PEN International’s Resolution on the state of freedom of expression in Crimea (Resolución sobre el estado de la libertad de expresión en Crimea de PEN International), adoptada por la Asamblea de delegados en 2019, disponible en: https://pen-international.org/...

[xii] Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Ukrainian Teachers Balk As Moscow Seeks To Impose 'Russian Standards' In Occupied Territories (los profesores ucranianos se resisten mientras Moscú busca imponer «estándares rusos» en los territorios ocupados), 23 de mayo de 2022, disponible en: https://www.rferl.org/a/ukrain...

[xiii] PEN Ucrania, Statement on enforced disappearance of Iryna Danilovych in occupied Crimea (Declaración sobre la desaparición forzosa de Iryna Danilovych en la Crimea ocupada), 9 de mayo de 2022, disponible en: https://pen.org.ua/en/zayava-c...

[xiv] United Nations Stands with People of Ukraine, Secretary-General Tells General Assembly, Stressing ‘Enough Is Enough’, Fighting Must Stop, as Emergency Session Gets Under Way (Las Naciones Unidas se solidarizan con el pueblo de Ucrania, declara el Secretario General ante la Asamblea General, enfatizando que «ya basta», la lucha debe cesar, mientras se celebra la sesión de emergencia), 28 de febrero de 2022, disponible en: https://press.un.org/en/2022/g...


French version

RESOLUTION SUR LA GUERRE EN UKRAINE

Le 24 février 2022, la Fédération de Russie a lancé une invasion militaire de grande envergure en Ukraine, provoquant une crise humanitaire et des droits humains d’une ampleur inimaginable. Des milliers de civils ont été tués ou blessés au cours d’attaques menées par les forces russes. Ces dernières sont accusées de crimes de guerre, de crimes contre l’humanité ou de génocide,[i] notamment d’exécutions sommaires de civils et de prisonniers de guerre, de détentions arbitraires et de déportations massives forcées, d’enlèvements et de disparitions, de torture et de maltraitance, de violences sexuelles liées au conflit et de crimes contre le patrimoine culturel.[ii] Plus de 7 millions de personnes ont été déplacées à l’intérieur de l’Ukraine, et 7.4 millions de personnes ont dû quitter le pays. Deux millions de personnes, dont des enfants orphelins ou séparés de leurs parents à cause de la guerre, ont été transportées de force en Fédération de Russie. Les bombardements incessants de zones résidentielles, de centres médicaux et d’écoles ont provoqué de nombreux décès et des destructions considérables. La Fédération de Russie brandit par ailleurs la menace nucléaire. Les Nations Unies ont prévenu que la guerre de la Fédération de Russie contre l’Ukraine, à laquelle s’ajoutent les effets du changement climatique et de la pandémie de Covid-19, menace de déclencher une crise alimentaire mondiale qui pourrait durer des années.[iii] La guerre est source de pollution, et toute substance rejetée sur le sol ukrainien, qu’elle soit nucléaire ou chimique, menace la paix et la vie futures de tous.

La libre circulation d’informations indépendantes et précises est essentielle dans les situations de conflit. PEN International s’inquiète vivement de la sécurité des journalistes et des professionnels des médias en Ukraine, où ils seraient pris pour cible, kidnappés, attaqués et tués. Au moins 39 journalistes et professionnels des médias ukrainiens et étrangers ont été tués dans cette guerre ; huit d’entre eux ont perdu la vie dans l’exercice de leurs fonctions professionnelles : Yevhen Sakun, Brent Renaud, Oleksandra Kuvshynova, Pierre Zakrzewski, Oksana Baulina, Maks Levin, Mantas Kvedaravičius, et Frédéric Leclerc-Imhoff.[iv] Selon le droit international humanitaire, les journalistes sont considérés comme des civils. Une attaque visant à tuer, blesser ou enlever un journaliste constitue un crime de guerre. PEN International exprime également son inquiétude quant à la sécurité de l’écrivain ukrainien Volodymyr Vakulenko, qui aurait été arrêté par les forces russes vers la fin du mois de mars dans la région de Kharkiv et qui n’a plus donné signe de vie depuis.[v] Le militant des droits humains et journaliste Maksym Butkevych est retenu en captivité par les forces russes depuis juin, après avoir rejoint les forces armées ukrainiennes pour défendre l’Ukraine.[vi]

PEN International juge alarmante la campagne de désinformation menée par les autorités russes en Ukraine. Les médias et Internet semblent avoir été intentionnellement pris pour cible en vue de perturber l’accès à l’information, notamment par le biais de séries de cyber-attaques. Les équipements et installations des médias constituent des biens civils et ne doivent pas faire l’objet d’attaques ou de représailles. L’utilisation de la propagande de guerre et de haine nationale, qui attise la violence, doit cesser de toute urgence.[vii] La guerre de la Fédération de Russie ne vise pas seulement l’Ukraine en tant qu’État et les Ukrainiens en tant que nation, mais également l’identité et la culture ukrainiennes. De nombreux musées, bibliothèques et archives ont été attaqués. Les musées du pays sont contraints d’évacuer tous leurs trésors artistiques et culturels pour tenter de sauver le patrimoine culturel ukrainien de la destruction.[viii] En septembre 2022, la Fédération de Russie avait déjà commis 514 crimes contre le patrimoine culturel de l’Ukraine, principalement dans les régions de Kharkiv, Donetsk et Kiev.[ix] Ces crimes concernent notamment des sites d’importance nationale, d’importance locale, des sites du patrimoine culturel nouvellement découverts et des objets provenant de bâtiments historiques de valeur. Au moins 183 sites religieux ont été endommagés par l’armée russe dans 14 régions d’Ukraine.[x]

La situation sur le territoire contrôlé par les forces armées russes et les groupes armés affiliés suscite de vives inquiétudes. L’espace civique déjà limité en Crimée occupée, dans les régions de Donetsk et de Louhansk — sous contrôle russe depuis mars 2014 — se réduit encore davantage.[xi] Des dizaines de résidents de Crimée ont été poursuivis simplement pour avoir appelé à la paix, ce qui constitue une violation flagrante du droit international, selon lequel la Fédération de Russie est tenue de respecter le droit pénal du territoire occupé. Des « normes russes » sont imposées dans les écoles locales, tandis que l’enseignement de la langue, de l’histoire et de la littérature ukrainiennes est progressivement supprimé. L’accès aux chaînes de télévision ukrainiennes a été bloqué et les fournisseurs d’accès à Internet ont été remplacés par des fournisseurs russes.[xii] Des journalistes civils et des militants des droits humains restent derrière les barreaux pour des motifs politiques, notamment les journalistes citoyens Osman Arifmemetov, Marlen (Suleyman) Asanov, Asan Akhtemov, Remzi Bekirov, Tymur Ibrahimov, Server Mustafayev, Seyran Saliyev, Ruslan Suleymanov, Rustem Sheikhaliyev, Amet Suleymanov, Vilen Temeryanov et Iryna Danilovych,[xiii] ainsi que les journalistes Oleksiy Bessarabov, Vladyslav Yesypenko, et Nariman Dzhelyal, premier vice-président de l’Assemblée des Tatars de Crimée et ancien journaliste. Les soi-disant « référendums » dans les territoires ukrainiens sous occupation russe des régions de Donetsk, Kherson, Louhansk et Zaporijjia sont une autre violation du droit international et un prétexte pour que la Fédération de Russie annexe illégalement des terres ukrainiennes.

La Fédération de Russie fait fi de ses obligations internationales. Elle bafoue les principes mêmes de la Charte des Nations Unies, notamment les dispositions relatives à la sécurité et à la paix entre les pays, pour faire taire les voix critiques.[xiv]

Lors de son 83e congrès mondial à Lviv, en Ukraine, la communauté internationale de PEN s’est unie d’une seule voix pour appeler à un règlement pacifique de la guerre menée par la Fédération de Russie en Ukraine. L’Assemblée des délégués de PEN International, réunie à l’occasion de son 88e Congrès annuel à Uppsala, en Suède, condamne fermement la guerre totale menée par la Fédération de Russie contre l’Ukraine et demande instamment à la Fédération de Russie :

§ de mettre un terme immédiat à la guerre en Ukraine ;

§ d’enquêter sur les allégations, de poursuivre et de punir les membres des forces armées reconnus coupables de violations du droit international des droits humains et du droit international humanitaire, notamment en matière d’exécutions sommaires, de violences sexuelles, de torture et d’autres traitements cruels, inhumains ou dégradants à l’encontre de civils et de prisonniers de guerre ;

§ de libérer immédiatement toutes les personnes détenues uniquement pour avoir exercé pacifiquement leur droit à la liberté d’expression, notamment Osman Arifmemetov, Marlen (Suleyman) Asanov, Asan Akhtemov, Remzi Bekirov, Tymur Ibrahimov, Server Mustafayev, Seyran Saliyev, Ruslan Suleymanov, Rustem Sheikhaliyev, Amet Suleymanov, Vilen Temeryanov, Oleksiy Bessarabov, Vladyslav Yesypenko, Nariman Dzhelyal et Iryna Danilovych ;

§ de renoncer immédiatement à la pratique des disparitions forcées et de tout mettre en oeuvre pour connaître clairement la situation de toutes les personnes victimes de disparitions forcées ou portées disparues, y compris Volodymyr Vakulenko et Maksym Butkevych, afin de poursuivre et de punir les responsables, et d’offrir des recours effectifs aux victimes ;

§ de mettre immédiatement fin aux pratiques d’arrestation, de poursuite ou de condamnation de civils pour des actes commis ou pour des opinions ou des idées exprimées avant son occupation du territoire en Ukraine et qui n’étaient pas criminalisées à l’époque.

Elle demande également à la communauté internationale :

§ de continuer à demander instamment à la Fédération de Russie de mettre fin immédiatement et sans condition à la guerre en Ukraine ;

§ d’assurer une intervention globale et systématique auprès de toutes les personnes fuyant l’Ukraine, sans discrimination ;

§ d’accroître son soutien pour assurer la pérennité des médias en Ukraine. de prendre des initiatives permettant aux journalistes et aux médias ukrainiens en exil de poursuivre leur travail professionnel, de manière durable et adaptée aux conditions exceptionnelles auxquelles ils sont confrontés ;

§ de soutenir tous les efforts visant à garantir la responsabilité, au niveau national et international, des violations du droit international des droits humains et du droit international humanitaire commises en Ukraine, et d’œuvrer collectivement à la mise en place de voies de recours, à la réparation des violations passées et à la prévention de nouvelles violations.

[i] HCDH, La situation des droits humains en Ukraine dans le contexte de l’attaque armée de la Fédération de Russie, du 24 février 2022 au 15 mai 2022, publié en juin 2022, disponible à l’adresse suivante : https://www.ohchr.org/en/docum... . Le 2 mars 2022, le Procureur de la Cour pénale internationale a annoncé qu’il ouvrait une enquête concernant la situation en Ukraine sur la base des dossiers reçus. Les faits visés couvrent les allégations de crimes de guerre, de crimes contre l’humanité ou de génocide commis en Ukraine depuis le 21 novembre 2013 : https://www.icc-cpi.int/ukrain...

[ii] Ministère ukrainien de la Culture et de la Politique de l’information, la Russie a déjà commis 434 crimes contre le patrimoine culturel de l’Ukraine, 22 juillet 2022, disponible à l’adresse suivante : https://www.kmu.gov.ua/en/news...

[iii] ONU, Si nous ne nourrissons pas les peuples, nous nourrissons les conflits, déclare le Secrétaire général lors de l’événement ministériel portant sur l’appel à l’action pour la sécurité alimentaire mondiale, avertissant de la menace de la faim massive, 18 mai 2022, disponible à l’adresse suivante : https://press.un.org/en/2022/s...

[iv] PEN Ukraine, Journalistes en guerre, disponible à l’adresse suivante : https://pen.org.ua/en/zhurnali...

[v] PEN Ukraine, l’écrivain ukrainien Volodymyr Vakulenko a été enlevé par les occupants russes, 11 avril 2022, disponible à l’adresse suivante : https://pen.org.ua/en/ukrayins...

[vi] PEN Ukraine, Le militant des droits humains et journaliste Maksym Butkevych est retenu captif par les occupants russes, 11 juillet 2022, disponible à l’adresse suivante : https://pen.org.ua/en/pravozah...

[vii] HCDH, Ukraine : Déclaration conjointe sur l’invasion de la Russie et l’importance de la liberté d’expression et d’information, 4 mai 2022, disponible à l’adresse suivante : https://www.ohchr.org/en/state...

[viii] The Guardian, « Le patrimoine ukrainien est directement attaqué » : pourquoi la Russie pille les musées du pays, 27 mai 2022, disponible à l’adresse suivante : https://www.theguardian.com/ar...

[ix] Ministère ukrainien de la Culture et de la Politique de l’information , Protéger le patrimoine culturel ukrainien, disponible à l’adresse suivante : https://restore.mkip.gov.ua/en

[x] 43 Ministère ukrainien de la Culture et de la Politique de l’information : La Russie a endommagé au moins 183 sites religieux en Ukraine, 27 juillet 2022, disponible à l’adresse suivante : https://www.kmu.gov.ua/en/news...

[xi] Résolution de PEN International sur l’état de la liberté d’expression en Crimée, adoptée par l’Assemblée des délégués en 2019, disponible à l’adresse suivante : https://pen-international.org/...

[xii] Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Les professeurs ukrainiens s’opposent aux efforts de Moscou pour imposer les « normes russes » dans les territoires occupés, 23 mai 2022, disponible à l’adresse suivante : https://www.rferl.org/a/ukrain...

[xiii] PEN Ukraine, Déclaration sur la disparition forcée d’Iryna Danilovych en Crimée occupée, 9 mai 2022, disponible à l’adresse suivante : https://pen.org.ua/en/zayava-c...

[xiv] Les Nations Unies sont solidaires du peuple ukrainien, déclare le secrétaire général à l’Assemblée générale, déclarant que « ça suffit » et que les combats doivent cesser lors de la session d’urgence, 28 février 2022, disponible à l’adresse suivante : https://press.un.org/en/2022/g...